“Cellular Messengers In Saliva” May Regulate Oral Bacteria Growth

The UCLA Newsroom states a new study led by UCLA researchers “provides clear evidence that cellular messengers in saliva may be able to regulate the growth of oral bacteria responsible for diseases, such as periodontitis and meningitis.” The article adds the study suggests that “a body’s cellular messengers play an important …

Images Of Decaying Teeth May Deter Sugary Drink Sales, Survey Finds

The Guardian reported that a new study has found “graphic health warnings like those on cigarette packets, showing rows of rotten teeth on cans of cola and other sugary drinks, could deter some young adults from buying them.” Prof. Anna Peeters from Australia’s Deakin University and colleagues surveyed nearly 1,000 people …

Signs Of Increased Heart Disease Risk May Include Poor Oral Health

CNN  hosts an article from The Conversation that includes poor oral health among several signs a person may have an increased risk of heart disease. The article notes research suggests periodontitis and tooth loss are associated with heart disease, and says other signs may include creased earlobes; fatty bumps, known …

Dental Care Before Major Cancer Surgery May Reduce Risk Of Complications, Study Suggests

Reuters (8/28, Crist) reports a study published in the British Journal of Surgery found that patients who are undergoing “major cancer surgery might reduce their risk of complications by seeing a dentist beforehand.” The researchers discovered that patients “who visited a dentist were slightly less likely to have post-surgery pneumonia …

Reducing post-op complications after cancer surgery

Improving patients’ oral hygiene is an option for preventing postoperative pneumonia that may be caused by aspiration of oral secretions. Whether preoperative oral care by a dentist can decrease postoperative complications remains controversial. A retrospective study was undertaken to assess the association between preoperative oral care and postoperative complications among …

Midlife Tooth Loss Associated With Higher Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease

Medical News Today reported that preliminary research found “tooth loss in middle age is tied to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, independent of traditional risk factors such as high blood pressure, poor diet, and diabetes.” Study co-author Lu Qi, who is a professor of epidemiology at Tulane University, said, …